Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology

Official Journal of the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology

Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology Cover Image
Open Access

Total hip arthroplasty with a ribbed anatomic HA coated stem

  • M. Fortina1Email author,
  • S. Carta1,
  • D. Gambera1,
  • E. Crainz1,
  • P. Pichierri1 and
  • P. Ferrata1
Journal of Orthopaedics and TraumatologyOfficial Journal of the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology20067:134

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10195-006-0134-9

Received: 18 June 2006

Accepted: 16 July 2006

Published: 25 September 2006

Abstract

In total hip arthroplasty, a straight stem seems to provide better results than an anatomic one. A new generation of anatomic stems is under evaluation, so the follow-up is still short and cannot compare with studies of straight stems. The clinical and radiographic results of 176 patients who underwent 189 primary total hip arthroplasties using an anatomic, collared, proximally hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated femoral component were prospectively determined from 1 to 6 years follow-up. The stem is ribbed in the metaphyseal region, allowing to decrease the elasticity modulus, to augment the surface for bone ingrowth and to preserve the space needed for the circulation of the inner half side of the corticalis. The average postoperative Harris hip score was 96.7 points. All femoral components had radiographic evidence of bone ingrowth fixation at the final follow-up. There were no cases of loosening for any reason. The strength of the study is limited by the short follow-up, but our preliminary excellent clinical results with stable bone ingrowth fixation allow us to continue to use this stem following patients over time.

Key words

Anatomic stemTotal hip arthroplastyHydroxyapatiteBone ingrowth

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